Protect Your Bones

Lutheran Health Network - Protect Your Bones

You are never too young or too old to protect your bones. Now is the time to take action.

What you should know…

  • People used to think that getting osteoporosis was a normal part of aging. As it turns out, osteoporosis is a disease you can do something about. It can be prevented, detected and treated. It’s never too late to take action to protect your bones.
  • Bone is living, growing tissue that is both flexible and strong.
  • Throughout life, you are constantly losing old bone and forming new bone.
  • Osteoporosis happens when you lose too much bone, make too little of it or both.
  • Today ten million people (two million men and eight million women) in the US are estimated to have osteoporosis.
  • Some medicines and diseases can cause bone loss.
  • Women can lose up to 20 percent of their bone density in the five to seven years after menopause.
  • Bone loss usually speeds up at midlife in both men and women.
  • People with osteoporosis cannot feel their bones getting weaker, and many people do not know they have osteoporosis until they break a bone.
  • People with osteoporosis most often break a bone in the hip, spine or wrist, but they can also break other bones.

Source: National Osteoporosis Foundation

What can you do…

  • You need to get enough calcium and vitamin D every day to keep your bones healthy.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables.
  • Stay physically active to keep your bones strong and healthy. You should exercise at least 2 ½ hours every week. That’s 150 minutes, and more is even better.
  • Do weight-bearing and muscle strengthening exercises. Don’t want to lift weights? Walking is weight-bearing – so is dancing, various sports like tennis, hiking and skiing. Of course light dumbbells and resistance bands also work.
  • Improve your balance through balance training exercises.
  • Prevent falls by taking a close look at your home and eliminating potential hazards like rugs.
  • Learn posture exercises.
  • Have your hearing and vision checked each year.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • Limit caffeine.
  • Talk to your doctor about your bone health. Ask if you need a bone mineral density test.

Source: National Osteoporosis Foundation

25 Calcium-Rich Foods

Item 
Serving Size
Estimated Calcium (mg)
Soy milk with added calcium 
8 oz (1 cup)
80-500
Yogurt, low-fat or fat free (plain)  
1 cup (8 oz)
415
Fruit juice with added calcium
6 oz
200-345
Ricotta cheese, part skim
4 oz (1/2 cup) 
335
Sardines, canned in oil with bones
3 oz 
325
Milk, low-fat or fat-free
1 cup (8 oz) 
300
Swiss cheese 
1 oz
220-270
Ice cream, low-fat or high fat 
1 cup (8 oz) 
140-210
Cheddar cheese, shredded  
1 oz
205
Frozen yogurt, vanilla (soft serve)  
1 cup (8 oz) 
205
Mozzarella cheese, part skim 
1 oz 
205
Tofu prepared with calcium 
4 oz (1/2 cup)
205
Turnip greens, fresh, cooked and drained
8 oz (1 cup) 
200
Cereal with added calcium, without milk
8 oz (1 cup) 
100-200
Salmon, pink, canned with bones
3 oz  
180
American cheese
1 oz 
175
Soybeans, mature, cooked and drained
8 oz (1 cup)
175
Cottage cheese, 1 % milk fat   
1 cup 
140
Shrimp, canned  
3 oz  
125
Kale, cooked 
8 oz (1 cup) 
95
Bok choy (Chinese cabbage), raw
8 oz (1 cup)
75
Parmesan cheese, grated 
1 tbsp   
70
Broccoli, cooked and drained 
8 oz (1 cup)  
60
Dried figs   
2 figs
55
Oranges  
1 whole  
50

Source: National Osteoporosis Foundation

For more information on living healthy, contact:

Dupont Hospital Personal Lifestyle Management
(260) 416-3009 (260) 416-3009

Lutheran Weight Management Center
(260) 435-7844 (260) 435-7844

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